Persistent identifier:
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11th Month,~1
MM. J
NOVEMBER—30 days.
ziSQB HAVE so rowan OVER SOULS.
THE MOON'S CHANGES.
Ffrsf Qwar&r ...... 1st, .... 37 mln. past 2 afternoon.
Full Moon ........ 9th, .... 50 mln. past 9 morning.
Zod @i«&rkr........ITtli, .... 2 mln. past 2 afternoon.
Now Moon ........24th.....20 min. past 9 morning.
LUPO NON MANOIA LUPO-WOLVES DON'T
EAT WOLVES.
1 M
2 Tu
3 W
4 Tli
5 F
6 S
7 S>
8 M
9 Tu
10 W
11 Th
12 F
13 S
14 s
15 M
16 Tu
17 W
18 Tli
19 F
20 S
21 S
22 M
23 Tu
24 W
25 Tli
20 F
27 S
21st jfuttimjr aft. ®rtiutjr.
Dr. Sliebbeare, politician, bom, 1709. Prince of Wales born, 1841.
" j/ (As cap /W, wear it"
.ScofcA jFerm.
Charles Eemble, actor, died, 1834. Last Stamford Bull-running, 1839.
28 &
29 M
30 Tu
viZf AwtZs' Day.
Mikado of Japan bom, 1852.
George Peabody died, 1869.
Gunpowder Plot, 1605.
Daniel Dancer, miser, died, 1794.
22tt£r jsknt&ng aft. ®rnttty.
Domesday Book completed, 1086. Henry III. of England died, 1272. Suez Canal opened, 1809.
" Atck a/bUtgr, swcA o eon." Charles I. of England bom, 1600. 21. Princess Royal bom, 1S40.
aft. ©rhubr.
CkcfZia.
Tliomas Tallis, musician, died, 1585.
"ITefp /or 7 Raw «o kwufd." Rev. John Kitto died, 1854.
Princess Maud of Wales born, 18G9. Duchess of Tcck bom, 1883.
lst j^mtbag nt ^.bircnt.
28. Washington Irving, author, d., 1353. ,8(. uiwfDay.
8 ux
lliscs &8ets
G oor 1 30s G68r 127s 7 2r 123s 7 5r 120s 7 9r 117s 7 12r 1 lis 7 16r 1 lis
7 19r
4 8s 7 23r 1 6s 7 26r 4 3s 7 30r 1 Is 7 33r 3 69s 7 3Gr ■j 57s 7 39r 3 55s 7 42r 3 63s
ATooa Hisei" &Sotg !
5
Morn. 8
0 14 9
1 30 10
2 43 11
3 65 12
5 6 13
G 18 r.jf. 14 O
4 17 16
4 57 17
5 48 IS
6 51 10
7 65 20
9 G 21
10 20 22
11 35 £
Morn. 24
0 62 25
2 10 26
3 34 27
5 3 28
636 29
SeJs P.M. 4 30 @ 1
5 45 2
7 11 3
8 37 4
10 0 5
11 19 6
WORDS OF THE WISE.
Tun purest Bold is tlie most pliable.
The man who feels certain that lie will not succeed is seldom mistaken.
Hurry and cunning are tlie two apprentices of dispatch and of skill; but neither of them ever learn their masters' trade.
Iimvo could know all it would not be so hard to forgiveall.
Womex act more from love and duty than from reason or prudence.
"Would you he noble? Look to the noble and follow the noble. Would you teach others to be noble? First learn to be noble yourself.
NOTES TO THE CALENDAR.
Z7k word /br cold one odt'd
Au/rbnd;
A 4a, said As—(is of my finger"*
, 6.—Abont six months before tbe death of Daniel Dancer, tho famous miser, during a hot summer's day, lie was observed by a neighbour very assiduously employed in throwing water from a pool, by moans of it frying pan, on tbe surrounding meadow, which happened to bu burnt up.
Uu being questioned as to tbe pmect of liis labours, lie observed, ' that he wanted a bit of nice fresh grass for bis old horse, for bay being thru very dear, a poor body ought to be sparing of it."
The same person, retnming in three or four hours afterwards, found tbe old man In tear*, and ou inquiring the cause,-was informed, that he had worked with the frying-pan until be was tired, when falling asleep on the grass, pome rogue bad stolen a pocket-book from him containing three hundred and fifty pounds in bank-notes, which lie had received the day before for some ricks of bay that ho had sold."
8.—When Doctor Bhcbheare stood in the pillory in London, for writing a lihel, it being rainy, a porter was employed to hold an umbrella over him. Tbe man afterwards applied for pay, and wad prddeuied with a shilling.
He thought this sum Inadequate, and pleaded for more.
The Doctor observed," You stood but one hour, sir, and surely I have paid enough."
"It is enough for the work, I grant," replied tbe porter," but for Heaven's sake, your honour, consider the disgrace of being exposed in company with you. I and that one half of the staring multitude took me for a rogue as well as your honour, and, by all that's honest, I would not go through tho samo again to be made a Justice of tho Quorum."
Ghehbeare paused a moment, took l«ack the shilling, and gave him a guluea.
13.—From time Immemorial down to a late period, the 13th of November was annually celebrated, at the town of Stamford, in Lincolnshire, by a public amusement termed a bull-running.
The sport was latterly conductcd in the following manner: About a quarter to eleven o'clock, on the festal-day, tlie bell of St. Mary's commenced to toll as aivaming fur the thoroughfares to bo cleared of Infirm people and children : and precisely at eleven, the bull was turned into a sireet, blocked up at each end by a barricade of carts and waggons.
At this moment every post, pump, and "coign of vantage" was occupied, and those happy enough to have such protections could grin at their less fortunate friends, who were compelled to have recourse to flight; the barricades, windows, and house-tops btdbg crowded with spectators.
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