Persistent identifier:
52118016
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1st Month,! 1897. J
JANUARY-31 days.
Tall blood is alike | AsaasT.
THE MOON'S CHANGES.
New Moon........ 3rd, ____
Fird Quarkr......10 th, ____
Full Moon ......18th, ____
Qwarkr ......25th, ____
8 mlnm past 6 morning. 46 min% past 0 afternoon. 17 min. past 8 afternoon.
9 min. past 8 afternoon.
tempi altri costumi-different
times different manners.
llF
2|8
S
M
Tu
W
Th
F
S
10 11 12
13
14
15
16
Sb
M
Tu
W
Th
F
S
17 IS
19
20 21
Sb
M Tu W Tli
22 F 23,8
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
3
M
Tu
W
Th
F
S
31
a
2/aw Yaor's Day.
1. Bant ZfoHday 6ico(Zand.
2nir j$nn. after (KJjristmas.
3. Josiah Wedgwood, diod, 170A. Dfridewk o% CWaoZa, (Be., diw.
Day.
" A year of anew a year q/ pfanfy."—
spanish Pnov.
9. Napoleon III. died, 1873.
CArfafmaa Ffra Znawranca maaf fw paid.
1st jsmtt. after (Kpipljarnr.
John 0. Lavater died, 180L
Zfikwy.
Duke of Clarence died, 1892. " January Wogaoma/Wf no maa'a caKar." Richard Savage, poet, bom, 1697.
after (Epipfjattjr.
German Empire proclaimed, 1871. Copemicns, astronomer, bom, 1472. 21. gf.
Louis XVI. executed, 1793. SL Ftucanf.
" jfarcA fn Jnmeaw,
Jawftaar iw i/arcA,
Srir #»#. after (Bpipljatty.
Cb?MW3fo% (/gf. f (%%Z.
Lord Jeffrey, critic, died, 1850.
German Emperor, William II., b.,1859.
Paris capitulated, 1871.
28. Emperor Charlemagne died, 814.
Charles I. executed, 1649.
4tfr <#mt. after (Bpipfrattg.
BUK Hi see &8eta Moon llises &Scts I
8 8r Rises A.M. 28
4 Is 7 55 29
8 8r Sets P.M. «
4 3s 6 33 1
8 8r 6*55 2
4 6s 8 14 3
8 7r 9 28 4
4 8a 10 40 5
8 6r 11 50 6
4 10s Morn. 3
8 5r 1 0 8
4 14s 2 11 9
8 3r 3 23 10
417s 4 34 11
8 lr 5 40 12
4 20s 6 38 13
7 59r 723 14
4 23s 7 67r P.M. 6 22 O 16
4 26s 6 45 17
7 ooi 8 8 18
4 30e 9 31 19
7 53r 10 55 20
4 33s Morn. 21
7 Sir 0 20 4 36e ] 48 23
7 49r 3 16 24
4 40s 4 38 25
7 46r 6 46 26
4 44s 6 36 27
7 43r 7 12 28
WORDS OF THE WISE.
FAITH was given man to lengthen ont his reason.
JKALOUSY is simply another name for self-love.
humility is the safest foundation to build any kind of superstructure on.
ALL is but Hp-wisdom which wants experience.
MkRdY Is sometimes an insult to justice.
who is ashamed of his imverty will surely be arrogant of his wealth.
NOTES TO THE CALENDAR.
7* fa moWa *o bear M&a a Aaro Ma ca&wniWaa a/ ft/a, baf 4* ia ifniobfa (a emiWmwa (a a^ar itndar (A aw* tcAaa (A a Mma Aaa orrfaad (a (riwnpA arar (Aaia; aiid aafy aa infaf Zfganf vfata a/ aacA oaaa can raaaaf iaAan f/taf Mma Aaa arrfaad.
3.—No one in the history of English pottery is more famous than Josiah Wedgwood, no was in every way a remarkable man.
Indifference and Idleness he could not tolerate, and his fine artistic sense was offended by any bit of imperfect work. In going through his works, he would lift the stick upon which he leaned and smash the ofbndlng article, saying," This won't do for Josiah Wedgwood."
All the while he had a keen insight into the character of his workmen, although he used to say that he had everything to teach them, even to the making of a table plate.
5.— This is the eve of the Epiphany, or Twelfth Day Eve. In some parts of Devonshire, before tbe days of Board-schools, steam engines, and threshing machines, It was customary on this eve for the farmer, attended by his workmen, to go to the orchard, and there, encircling one of the beat bearing trees, they drank with enthusiasm the following toast throe limes:
" JTara'a fa #aa, afd appfe-traa,
IKAanaa Mow Aiay'at bad, and iaAe*ca
Miaa may'a* Waza /
Awd taArnica Mow may'at Dear appfaa anaia/
Zfafa/aff/ aapa/aH/
Dwa/iaf—buaAef—amcta/aZZ, .
.Andmypackafa/aMfaa/ ZfMaza/" This done, they returned to the house, the doors of which they were sure to find bolted, by the women, who, be tbe weather what It might, were inexorable to all on treaties to open them till someone had guessed at what was on the spit, which was generally some nice little thing, dilhcult to hit on, and was tbe reward of him who first named it. The doors were then thrown open, and the lucky clodpole received the tit-bit as bis recompense. Borne were so superstitious as to believe that if they neglected this custom, the trees would bear no apples during all thatyear.
6.—Till the reign of George III. it was customary at Oourt on Twelfth Right to hold a public assembly for playing the game of basset, in which the king and roval family took part, the winnings being for the benoMt of the groom-porter, ah olBccr who in those days had an especial charge of the games of chance played In the pAlace, at which he acted in the capacity of umpire.
7.—The day after Twelfth Day was a popular rustic festival; nnder the mock name of #. Dfa&rfTa or -Boat Day. (Rock is the appellation of a quantity of lint put upon a distaif.) It seems to have been a sort of farewell to the festivities of Christmas.
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