Title:
PP/GC/PO/95 Letter from Lord Ponsonby to Henry John Temple, third Viscount Palmerston, concerning Bresson's accusations that Ponsonby induced him to resign, 7 April 1831
Date:
07/04/1831
Content:
Letter from John Ponsonby, second Baron Ponsonby, [British Joint Commissioner of the London Conference to the provisional government of Belgium], Brussels, to Henry John Temple, third Viscount Palmerston: he hears from Paris that Bresson indulges in saying all sorts of things against him. Palmerston knows best how well Ponsonby has deserved such treatment. Ponsonby does not want to reveal what he knows of Bresson's conduct and opinions, still less to imitate him in mis-stating private conversations, but he asks Palmerston to defend him against imputation of actual treachery, such as is implied in the letter he sent to Palmerston and in Bresson's assertions that Ponsonby induced him to resign. Palmerston may remember that Ponsonby reported his efforts to prevent Bresson's resignation, and also how little Ponsonby wanted him to be removed. "I leave it to you to settle with the P.P. [plenipotentiaries] the replies they gave to Mons[ieu]r Bresson, en attendant what I may think it proper to say to those gentlemen myself, if the thing is not explained." Ponsonby has taken some steps to defend himself at Paris against Bresson's "active malevolence". "I hold what he says in too much contempt to take much trouble about it, but I desire to make the King of the French aware of the facts." It is hard on Ponsonby to be the object of Bresson's animosity, because Bresson caused his own downfall by his foolish conduct. "I really believe the man is mad. That old rogue Tallyrand must have known that he lied to Bresson. As to the other compeers I know not what to say of them." De Celles has written to Barthelemy, Minister of Justice and Police, telling him that Leopold must be rejected by the Congress. Barthelemy has told this to friends and strangers. There is a loud outcry against France in Belgium. Ponsonby wishes Palmerston would order him home so that he could speak to him on the affairs of Belgium. 7 Apr 1831 The letter is marked: "Private" and it is noted on the docket that it was received on 10 April 1831.
Extent:
One paper
License:
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Subject:
John Ponsonby, second Baron Ponsonby, later first Viscount Ponsonby, British Joint Commissioner of the London Conference to the provisional government of Belgium
Charles Joseph Bresson, later Comte Bresson, former French Joint Commissioner of the London Conference to the provisional government of Belgium
Louis Philippe, King of the French
Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord, Prince de Benevent, alias Tallyrand, French ambassador at London
Antoine Charles Fiacre, Comte de Wisher de Celles, Belgian representative at Paris
Antoine Barthelemy, Belgian Minister of Justice
Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg, later Leopold I, King of the Belgians
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