Title:
PP/GC/PO/30 Letter from Lord Ponsonby to Henry John Temple, third Viscount Palmerston, concerning the troubles caused in Belgium by protocol number seven, 3 January 1831
Date:
03/01/1831
Content:
Letter from John Ponsonby, second Baron Ponsonby, [British Joint Commissioner of the London Conference to the provisional government of Belgium, Brussels], to Henry John Temple, third Viscount Palmerston: he sends in a despatch the reply from the Belgian government to the note verbale of 31 December, sent in by Bresson and himself. He has only about five or ten minutes to write to Palmerston, as Prince Esterhazy's messenger is in a great hurry to depart, and he can think of little which would add to the meaning of the "pregnant answer". Palmerston should send instructions how to act. Ponsonby will do nothing at present except try to strengthen himself with Hooghvorst and his friends, those who hope to preserve peace. Hooghvorst was named general of the national guards for life the previous day by the Congress. Ponsonby foresaw the trouble that the protocol [number seven] would produce. "The difficulty now will be how to take the means of deception it affords to the provisional government out of their hands." If Bresson had seen things in the same light as Ponsonby, he would perhaps have tried to disobey his instructions and kept back the protocol. "The provisional government must either be destroyed or suffered to create a general war, and that too before the time when it is inevitable from general causes." Raising the blockade immediately, as Ponsonby recommended the previous day, seems to be the best thing to do at present. Belgium is "not French in disposition. It will only be made so by fear or mismanagement." 3 Jan 1831
Extent:
One paper
License:
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Subject:
John Ponsonby, second Baron Ponsonby, later first Viscount Ponsonby, British Joint Commissioner of the London Conference to the provisional government of Belgium
Charles Joseph Bresson, later Comte Bresson, French Joint Commissioner of the London Conference to the provisional government of Belgium
Paul Anton, Prince Esterhazy of Galantha, Austrian ambassador at London
Emmanuel Constantin Ghislain van der Linden, Baron van Hooghvorst, or Hoogvorst, commander in chief of the burgher guard in Brussels, and member of the provisional government of Belgium
Protocol seven of the London Conference of 20 December 1830: the dissolution of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands and allowance for a future independent Belgium
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