Title:
PP/GC/PO/211 Letter from Lord Ponsonby to Henry John Temple, third Viscount Palmerston, concerning the news from Persia, the plague has not Therapia, new house for ambassador's residence, and his need for instructions, 26 August 1834
Date:
26/08/1834
Content:
Letter from John Ponsonby, second Baron Ponsonby, later first Viscount Ponsonby, British ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary at Constantinople, Therapia, to Henry John Temple, third Viscount Palmerston: he wishes he could send Palmerston a letter from Mr Fraser to Mr Grant about Persia, but Fricker, the messenger will not be out of quarantine at Semlin until the 10 September [1834]. The Shah of Persia, has declared his grandson, Muhammad Mirza to be his successor. Ponsonby is glad not to be affected by the plague which has reached [the former ambassadorial residence] Pera but not his current dwelling at Therapia. He would like Palmerston to make a decision about his very economical idea of buying a house [at Therapia] for his residence rather than building a new house on the land of the old house at Pera. He assumes that the reason that Palmerston has not sent him any instructions is because he is content with Ponsonby's actions, however, the situation is fluid and issues might well arise which would require Palmerston's decisions. He congratulates Palmerston on his Parliamentary success. 26 Aug 1834 This letter is marked: "Private".
Extent:
One paper, punched for disinfection.
License:
All images are copyright. Please contact Archives@soton.ac.uk if you wish to reproduce this material
Subject:
Ottoman Empire, Sublime Porte, Turkey
James Baillie Fraser, traveller, special envoy to Teheran
Persia: Iran
Mr Grant
Mr Fricker, messenger, courier
Quarantine, infection, plague, disease, epidemic
Fath Ali or Futch Alleh, Shah of Persia
Shah of Persia: rule, succession
Muhammad or Mohammed Mirza, grandson of Fath Ali, Shah of Persia
British embassy building or ambassador's residence for Constantinople, at Pera, proposed building at Therapia
Semlin: Yugoslavia
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