Title:
PP/GC/CA/263 Copy of a letter from Henry John Temple, third Viscount Palmerston, to Sir S.Canning, asking Canning to urge the Swiss Diet not to abuse its victory over the Sonderbund, 2 December 1847: contemporary copy
Date:
02/12/1847
Content:
Copy, ?in the hand of a secretary, of a letter from Henry John Temple, third Viscount Palmerston, Foreign Office, London, to Sir Stratford Canning, [on an extraordinary mission to Berne]: he has changed his mind and wishes Canning to proceed as originally planned to Berne. Palmerston has discussed this with Broglie, and Canning should inform Guizot and the other three [ambassadors of Russia, Prussia and Austria] of the object of his instruction. Canning will be the only representative of the great powers in Berne but this is no bad thing as his advice there will have no less effect for not coming in conjunction with the other parties. Canning must make it clear to the conquering party of the Diet that they must not abuse their success: their troops are not the only army in Europe and other countries may have more funds at hand than Switzerland. Most importantly, it must be made clear than England will not go to war with France, Austria and Prussia to back the Swiss up in what the English government itself would acknowledge to be a "violation of the fundamental principle of the federal compact".<P> 2 Dec 1847: contemporary copy
Extent:
One paper
License:
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Subject:
Sir Stratford Canning, later first Viscount Stratford de Redcliffe, on an extraordinary mission to Berne
Achille Leonce Victor Charles, Duc de Broglie, French ambassador at London
Conference on the affairs on Switzerland, held by representatives of France, Britain, Russia, Prussia and Austria
Anton, Count Apponyi, Austrian ambassador at Paris
Monsieur Kisseleff, acting Russian ambassador at Paris
Alexander Heinrich, Baron von Arnim Suckow, Prussian envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary at Paris
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