Title:
PP/GC/CA/199 Letter from Sir S.Canning to Henry John Temple, third Viscount Palmerston, concerning a diplomatic transfer for Vedova, so that his three eligible daughters can find husbands, 29 January 1850
Date:
29/01/1850
Content:
Letter from Sir Stratford Canning, [British ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary at Constantinople], Therapia, [Turkey], to Henry John Temple, third Viscount Palmerston: Canning asks if anything can be done for Vedova, whom he recently recommended to Palmerston. Vedova "is an honest poor devil with lots of children and very meagre appointments, vegetating for ages amidst the ruins of Scio. He has it mainly at heart to settle three Miss Vedovas, all ripe - possibly to bursting - for marriage, and all as anxious as their Papa to find husbands, who unluckily are not to be found at Scio". A post is needed "somewhat nearer the high road of human intercourse, where the young ladies may be seen and appreciated". A post of vice consul at Smyrna or Therapia or even in Italy or France would be suitable. If a better post is not to be found, then maybe a rise in salary, of fifty pounds, could be arranged as a consolation for Vedova's twenty years' ill-paid service, which Palmerston could consider sufficient reason "with the fear of Cobden before your eyes". 29 Jan 1850 This letter is marked: "Private". Palmerston has written in pencil at the foot of the letter: "Register. P." PP/GC/CA/204 also refers to Vedova's situation.
Extent:
One paper
License:
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Subject:
Sir Stratford Canning, later first Viscount Stratford de Redcliffe, British ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary at Constantinople
Scio, alias Khios or Chios, Turkey, Ottoman empire, later Greece
Mr Vedova, on the British diplomatic staff at Khios
Richard Cobden, Member of Parliament for the West Riding of Yorkshire
Diplomatic appointments
Smyrna, later Izmir, Turkey; Therapia, Turkey
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