Title:
PP/GC/CA/126 Letter from Sir S.Canning to Henry John Temple, third Viscount Palmerston, regarding disputes in the Spanish court over the Portuguese succession, 14 February 1833
Date:
26/02/1833
Content:
Deciphered letter, in the hand of a secretary or Foreign Office clerk, from Sir Stratford Canning, [British minister on an extraordinary mission to Spain], Madrid, to Henry John Temple, third Viscount Palmerston: [Transcript] "I expect the answer to my note in three or four days and I am positively assured that it will be favourable. Judging from appearances, Zea will turn and not go out. The Queen is too strong for him. There will still be the difficulty of Don Miguel. He will hardly give way to persuasion. It is thought [f.1v] that the knowledge of the mediation of Spain and England will not be sufficient to make the people turn against him in Portugal, and those who wish best to Donna Maria in this country seem to think that Spain cannot possibly do more than exhort England to act by herself. Then comes [f.2r] the question whether this government will be prepared under such circumstances to adopt decisive measures. Remember that if present expectation be realised it will be of the greatest importance for me to know your intention on these points with the least possible delay." 14 Feb 1833: decipherment of c.26 Feb 1833 The encrypted letter was written on 14 February 1833 and arrived in London on the 26 February 1833, which is thus the earliest possible date for the deciphered version. The letter is marked: "Private and confidential".
Extent:
One paper
License:
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Subject:
Sir Stratford Canning, later first Viscount Stratford de Redcliffe, British minister on an extraordinary mission to Spain
Portugal, Spain: politics
Francisco Zea Bermudez, Spanish Prime Minister
Maria Cristina, Queen of Spain
Dona Maria da Gloria, later Maria II da Gloria, Queen of Portugal
Dom Miguel, declared Miguel I, King of Portugal
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