Persistent identifier:
MS137_AJ95_150_9
image: of 130
46
SIXTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT.
them, boys who had attended for two years could hardly read Hebrew, and others who could read did so in such a rapid and garbled way that it was next to impossible to follow them.
Having obtained, after much difficulty, a French spelling and reacling-book, I ascertained that out of the forty boys present five only could read, and that most indifferently.
The ages varied from twelve to fifteen,
Contrast this with the enlightened education received by the pupils in the Galata School, and it becomes apparent that a remedy is called for.
I propose briefly to glance at—•
(«) The reforms desirable in the Schools subventioned by the Anglo-Jewish Association and the Alliance Israelite.
(b) The means of improving the education of the children attending the Talmud Tora Schools.
The technical training of the pupils in the subventioned Schools must in the first instance be increased, either by the extension of the apprenticeship system, or the establishment of training schools as independent departments. The first means has been adopted by the subventioned schools, but the second has not.
The test of success is the result, and the technical training-department at Messrs. Camondo's Schools at Haskeui is the example of success that may be held up as an encouragement to the adoption of this additional means of bringing practical technical education within the reach of the pupils of the subventioned schools.
I have not had the advantage of reading the details of Mr. Edward M. Henriques' scheme for the formation of an educational fund of £10,000 (I am writing these lines in Constantinople), but I understand the fund is to be applied for the purposes of instruction in useful manual labour. This being so, I cannot too highly commend the proposal and its objects. Money given to be expended in this way is the truest charity.
Inow as to the means of improving the education of children attending the Talmud Tora Schools.
We are here met by grave difficulties ; but difficulties, as I trust and believe, not insurmountable. We have to contend with the large number of the schools, and the illiterate state of the poor children and their parents; and, last, not least, with the bigotry and tenacity of the untrained and un-
Facebook Twitter Stumbleupon Delicious Digg RSS