Persistent identifier:
MS137_AJ95_150_9
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SCHOOLS IN THE EAST.
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the Lionel cle Rothschild School in Jerusalem are conspicuously set forth in the following remarks with which Mr. Noel Temple Moore, Her Majesty's Consul, favoured the Managers of the School. Mr. Moore states :—
Soon after the establishment of this Institution, I formed a very favourable opinion of it, and of the practical advantages likely to result from its happy combination of educational with industrial instruction, a feature well adapted to the peculiar local circumstances. A visit which I had the pleasure of paying yesterday to the school, and some examination of the pupils and an inspection of the workshops, more than confirmed that opinion, as I found the pupils much more advanced than I anticipated, both in the elementary and higher branches of knowledge. I was also much pleased with the order, neatness, and cheerfulness which prevailed, and consider that great credit is due to the able and zealous Director, Mr. Nissim Behar, and his staff of Superintendents and Teachers. I would recommend that enlarged and more suitable premises be provided for the Institution, and more adequate means placed at the disposal of the Director for the more effectual teaching of the English language.
Jww: 80;%, 1886.
With regard to the Industrial Department, Mr. G. F. Jackson, the Technical Instructor, has furnished a number of reports. The following is an extract from one of these reports
We have 04 apprentices in our workshop, viz., 27 carpenters, 18 smiths, 17 tailors, 17 shoemakers, 9 sculptors, 4 wood turners and 2 tinsmiths. Their ages range from 11 to 30 years.
Carpenters.—The carpenter-apprentices have improved considerably during the past six months. The work turned out is equal to any done in Jerusalem, and consists in the manufacture of chairs, tables, window-frames, doors, cupboards, boxes, chests of drawers, wardrobes, and other useful articles. Ihe repairs they undertake are numerous. They repair broken articles very neatly and quickly.
Smiths.—The blacksmiths' work chiefly consists in making iron balconies, bedsteads, stair rails, locks and keys, rock borers (used by the natives), and stone-dressing tools. The apprentices in this shop work very well; the elder ones are able to weld, harden, and temper steel very fairly. During
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