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appeared to the Council that the desired purpose would not be served by the mere transmission of the document, and it was resolved not to take any further action for the moment, especially as information of a more definite and precise nature concerning the condition of the Jews of Russia had just reached the Council, which would, in their opinion, render it desirable that a memorial of a totally different character to the contemplated address should be transmitted to the Emperor.
It must not be supposed, however, that the efforts of the Alliance and of this Association have been merely confined to the presentation of petitions. For many years past the Alliance has devoted itself to what is popularly known as " L'CEuvre Russe," and particulars of its action will be found detailed in the reports issued by it from 1869 to the present year. The circumstances which gave rise to the work may be thus briefly stated:—Intheyear 1869 a fearful famine ravaged a great part of Russia, and particularly Russian-Poland. Many died, entire districts were depopulated, and hundreds of children left orphans. In order to provide for these the Alliance issued an appeal which was liberally responded to, and expended the money obtained—1st., in assisting numerous families to emigrate to America, and elsewhere; and, 2ndly, in apprenticing as many of the orphans as they could to various handicraft trades in different parts of Germany, and especially at Konigs-berg, Liegnitz, and Cologne. Their object in doing this was that these children might be carefully trained to habits of industry, and that when grown up and in a position to earn their livelihood, they might, in their turn, render assistance, whether by the force of their example or in other ways, to their less favoured brethren who remained in Russia, and thus take their share in the work of regenerating them. The Alliance has expended vast sums of money in the undertaking, and recently addressed to the Association two powerful
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