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APPENDIX B.—JEWS IN THEIR VARIOUS HABITATIONS. 49
Cbbiwa developed by Baron Edmond de Rothschild, will exercise a beneficent influence upon this depressed population, and that the aids from abroad will m future be apportioned rather with a view to self-help dence ® people in a state of perpetual depen-
Bagdad, Bussorah, and most of the other important cities containing large congregations. There are also rnauy in fIlle! ailc T^r,a a generally—an Arabic-speaking population, not all of Eebrewrace, who are but very little known, but who ^un-e our sympathy, since they are badly Seated, and m a state of much depression and ignorance.
A still larger number of Jews inhabit Turkey in Europe, of whom upwards of 40,000 are in Constantinople), possessing yen 01 eight good schools for boys and girls; and fully as many are to be found in Salonica, where are the model educational establishments founded by the late Dr. Adrianople, and most of the larger towns, have congregations o greater or less importance, composed generally of the descendantsof the Jews expelled from SpakC whose language they still speak By far the greater part of this population is m poverty; but since there is toleration in its widest signification we may reasonably hope that our many excellent schools, when able to be more fully developed, will be the means of raising the material, as well as the intellectual condition of the children who frequent them. There remains however very much yet to be done in this country; the greater number of the Jewish girls are still untaught, and the boys for the most part are massed in the institutions of the lalmud Torah, where all kinds of secular knowledge, and the language of the country, are absolutely ignored. " Thus arrived at maturity, they are only fitted for the most unskilled and meanest occupations; but the wonderful intelligence of the Jewish children in the East, and their aptitude for languages, presents a promising field for the greater development o education, which it is our dutv to stimulate by every possible means.
PERSIA.—There are probably some 40,000 to 50,000 Jews in rersia, very much oppressed and generally poor. In this country the educational appliances fall very much below the lequirements of the Jewish population, whose condition might be much ameliorated by a proper distribution of schools, which we are very anxious to create. About 10,000 to 15,000
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