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seventeenth annual report.
your Lordship by the Secretary of the Anglo-Jewish Association are, I firmly believe, gross exaggerations, ancl I would submit that too much importance should not be given to such reports. Doubtless many young women of Jewish extraction become converts to the Orthodox Church, but this they do for their own convenience and in order that they may contract advantageous marriages of a binding description, and not because they are in any manner molested or ill-used by Russian officials.
I enclose copy of a despatch from H. M. Vice-Consul at Batourn, as also copy of a report from the British Vice-Consul at Nicolaieff, bearing on the subject of expulsion of foreign Jews from their districts.
I have, &c.,
G. R. Perry.
The Marquis of Salisbury.
Sir,
[Enclosure.]
British Vice-Consulate, Batoum,
Gth January, 1888.
Referring to your despatch of the 21st ult., and the letter addressed by the Secretary of the Anglo-Jewish Association to the Marquis of Salisbury, I have the honour to report that, with the view to obtaining the requisite information, I proceeded to Kutais, and from what I ascertained there on official and most trustworthy authority, I may state that the telegrams published in the Times and the Daily Neios, though not entirely baseless, convey a wrong and exaggerated notion as to the circumstance and extent of the late expulsion of Jews from the Caucasus. No decree to that effect has been issued by the Governor-General of the Caucasus. It was the Minister of the Interior who, at the beginning of last year, addressed a circular from St. Petersburg to the local authorities, requesting the same to enforce the regulations concerning Jews, according to which Jews may permanently settle only in certain districts of Russia, the Caucasus not being comprised within the region. All Jews, foreign as well as Russian subjects, having occasion to frequent this country, are subject to the general restrictions of the said regulations, with certain exceptions in favour of Russian Jews, being merchants of the First Guild, members of learned professions, as doctors, etc., and artisans furnished with certificates of competency, who are authorised to reside in the Caucasus.
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