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In 1650 was founded the Free Grammar School, but it does not appear to have been thoroughly established until 1553, in the 7th of Edward VI, after his visit to the town, when a royal charter was given to secure its permanency as " The Free Grammar School of the Mayor, Baliffs, and Burgesses, for the education and instruction of boys and youths in Grammar, for ever— •with one master, and one under-master," &c. The revenues arising from the property with which the school had been originally endowed, or enriched by subsequent benefactors, had been for many years previous to 1861 diverted to other purposes; and consequent on this misappropriation the school itself had fallen into desuetude. The Trustees, having obtained permission, under Mr. Foster's Minor Endowed Schools Act, to divert certain doles to the service of secondary Education, matured a scheme, under date October, 1875, for the re-organization of the school, and the enlargement and improvement of the building. The curriculum was brought into accordance with modern requirements by the addition of French, Drawing and Natural Science, to the necessary subjects of tuition throughout the school, The three term system was substituted for the old division of the scholastic year into four quarters, and a uniform charge of £7 10s. per annum adopted to include all subjects except Greek. At the same time the enlargement and partial rebuilding of the school-rooms and dormitories was effected at a cost of £1000, and the improvements were completed by the addition of a cloister, &o., and the relaying of the playground.
1 In 1552 Edward VI. passed through the town, and was exceedingly pleased with the reception he met with, the elegant and luxurious living of the inhabitants, and the beauty of the town and fortifications, he states in his letters to Barnaby Fitzpatrick. His interest in Southampton was further proved by his proposing to establish in it a great mart for the merchandise of South
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