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12th Month,! 1897. J
DECEMBER—31 days.

OVE IS THE T.OAIt STONE OF LOVK
THE MOON'S CHANGES.
Ffrsf Qw&rkf...... 1st, .... 14 min. past S morning.
Full Moon ........ 9th, .... 54 min. past 4 morning.
lad Quarkr ......17th, .... 22 min. post 4 morning.
&ewMoon 23rd, .... 55 min. past 7 afternoon.
Ftrd Qwarfer......SOth, .... 27 min. past 7 afternoon.
IL 8ECONDO PENSIEBO Z IL MIGLTORE-8ECOND THOUGHTS ABE BEST.
1 W
2 Tli
3 F
4 S
5 S
6 M
7 Tu
8 W
9 Tli
10 F
11 S
12 Z)
13 ivr
14 Tn
15 W
16 Th
17 F
18 S
19 So
20 M
21 Tu
22 W
23 Tli
24 F
25 S
26 3
27 M
28 Tu
29 W
30 Th
31 F
Princess of Wales bom, 1844. Amelia Opie, novelist, died, 1853.
"Awy Mff&f Aaa sAodow." Cardinal Richelieu died, 1042.
2ttir ^unitay xit ^Uriient.
Anthony Trollope, novelist, d., 1882. Algernon Sidney beheaded, 1083.
" fbok be meddf&yy." Gustavus Adolphus bom, 1594.
ZMoct came ^roifgg end*.
Richard Doyle, artist, died, 1883.
5rb ^itniiajj in JVilfcrent.
Dr. Samuel Johnson died, 1VS4. Prince Albert died, 1801.
George Bomney, artist, born, 1T34.
"Every heart has its own ache.1' Beethoven, musical composer, 1). 1770. 19. Turner, famous painter, d., 1851.
4tlj in JUbettt.
Deafrw are nowfeAed By dday." S(. Day.—Skorfesf Day.
21. iffcAaeZwaa law SiHfwys g?wL 34. Scribe, French dramatist, born, 1791. W. M. Thackeray, novelist, d., 1863. CHRISTMAS DAT.
lat jluttirag aft.fflljratntas
BOZIHG DAT.—BANK HOLIDAT.
fiDioceTt/e" Day.—27. Sf. JbA* (Ag Rt. Hon. W. B. Gladstone b., 1809. 28. Lord Macaulay died, 1859. 2f«o Feor"a
Smr Rises &Sets Moox Rises & Sets 1
7 45r Sets A.M. 1)
3 62a 0 32 8
7 48r 1 46 9
3 51s 2 57 10
7 Sir 4 8 11
3 60s 5 19 12
7 53r 6 27 13
3 50s 7 31 14
7 36r Rises. P.M. O
3 49s 4 41 16
7 58r 5 46 17
3 49a 6 56 18
8 Or 8 9 19
3 49s 9 23 20
8 lr 10 37 21
3 49s 11 52 22
8 8r Mom. C
3 50a i ii 24
8 5r 2 34 25
3 50s 4 0 26
8 6r 5 29 27
3 51s 6 53 28
8 7r Sets. P.M. «
3 53s 4 37 1
8 7r 6 6 2
3 54s 7 34 3
8 8r 8 68 4
3 55s 10 16 5
8 Sr 11 32 6
3 57s Morn. D
8 8r 0 45 8
WORDS OF THE WISE.
Some homes are merely well-regulated excuse factories.
ART mind that is capable of a real sorrow is capable of good.
To moum without measure Is folly : not to mourn at all, Insensibility.
Los* not thine own for want of asking for it; 'twill get thee no thanks.
THERE Is no wisdom In having a man to watch a bank who believes that stealing chickens is right.
NOTES TO THE CALENDAR.
Ape brfmpa Wedom, but doesn't 9 HM its mwcA Mme fo use , 13. — Among the curious yet happy marriages which are matters of history is that of Dr. Samuel Johnson. Before he was thirty years old Dr. Johnson met a widow almost double his age, unattractive to others, yet to him the wisest and loveliest of women. They lived together in perfect accord, and after she left him a most remark-ftblQ prayer was recorded in his diary in which he implored that Peggy might" minister unto him If departed spirits were permitted to have the care of the living." And so he remained faithful to her memory during the remaining twenty or more years of his pilgrimage.
19k—Turner stands alone as an example of a surpassing faculty for colour, combined with the lowest intellectual powers.
Hogarth, according to Walpole, was a man of a "gross and unln-formed mind." Nollekens never had . any notion of spelling or grammar. Reynolds himself Is said to have been deficient in scholastic attainments But Turner, ns regards the general enst of his mind, was little above the level of the idiot.
His mother, always a woman of fierce and ungovernable temper, became insane and had to he placed In confinement. Ills father was a loquacious barber, mmnn and dwarfish-looking, nnd without much stability of character. To this most unlikely couple there appears to have been no other child bom thnn the most renowned landscape painter of England.
24.—Tn Prance It is the custom to joke and laugh at every possible thing, no mnttcr how serious.
The following canard wns invented some years ago, Apropos of one of the accomplices in the murder of King Gustavus III. of Sweden. The Oount Bibbing had taken refuge in Paris, and at the time referred to was very old.
Scribe, with Auber, had just finished the opera of gnsfave, ou (a Daf jflaagw*.
Uncertain in several points, says the legend, Scribe went to Count Ribbing and hegeed him to assist at the rehearsal of the opera.
Be came, and followed the piece with great attention.
" Well I" asked Scrihe eagerly, " what do you smy to it ?"
"It's very nice, wry nice," said the Oount, slowly and somewhat coolly.
"But you don't seem altogether satisfied," urged Scribe.
" Well," answered the Oount, " you are slightly mistaken ; the affmir was not done quite In that way."
*' What more was there ?" anxiously inqnln d Scribe.
"It seems to me, as far as I can remember," answered the Count, with perfect simplicity, '(Ant we mtwdered Mm a more (o (Ae
fe/&"
Scribe thanked him and acted on the suggestion. The bare Idea of
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