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00660479
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1UJIV rn*PW-
SOUTHAMPTON AND DISTRICT PICTORIAL.
May i, 1912.
MATTERS OF MOMENT.
SHL
Of the Stock of LONG & SONS, of READING,
TOGETHER WITH OUR ANNUAL
SPRING CURTAIN SALE
THURSDAY, MAY 2nd, 1912
(FOR TEN DAYS ONLY).
Ic-Qal g]
We are declared the Purchasers of this Stock, amounting to £1,700, at a discount of 42^ or 8/9 in £ off Cost Price. We are offering this Stock, together with many Lots of Manufacturers' Clearing Lines and Samples, on above named date at quick clearing Prices.
EVERY LADY SHOULD VISIT US ON THIS OCCASION!
AYLWARD & SONS
Wine & Spirit Importers, Ale, Stout," and Cyder Bottlers.
38, High Street, SOUTHAMPTON.
And at JEWRY ST., WINCHESTER.
-KING ALFRED STATUE WINCHESTER Re*d. Trade Mark.
YACHTS AND SHIPPING SUPPLIED WITH BONDED STORES.
Silk
JOHN J. MABEY,
''jCadiei' Tailoring zfpeeiatiit,
34 CARLTON CRESCENT.
On Parle Francois. - From -
Man apricbt Dewucb. PARIS, BRUSSELS. BERLIN, LONDON.
Ladies are reminded that it is ALWAYS more economical to deal with a Specialist.
ESTIMATES GIVEN FOR ANY KIND OF GARMENT. PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION.
11 li
Underskirts and Knitted Golf Coats 50 per cent, reduction to clear.
e boon curetes.sjiofc on uic ]«\ri oi m tho (lay, wl ic. It may lia\o been a reflection only bo tlie .ei ilton (fsis " not quite—well, just ft ty the remkii ch? You kiiow what I mean."1 (hut she tedhl *ve been a touch of conscience that Thank voti
Vicious Circle.''
BY BAHBY PA1X.
Lady Vtrmoiso did not ask Mi*, l'alton for the 14th, when many dodrublo people would luvvo (been mat. Now, Lady Vczmob* had professed affection for Angola Palton, and -was distantly related to her.
It may have boon careicswios on tlic jxvrt of Lady Vermoue. H may ha\o been a reflect ior Chat Mrs. Pal tot littlo—rather, -
Aod it nwy have been a touch of oonwaenoo that made Lady VermoLse ask Mis. Pal ton for the iSth, when, however, nn her own stowing, them mould be nobody but (Imorge ((koigo ia a perfect
Mro. Palton's rcfusil for tho 19th wa< perfectly charming and polite. " I don't dream of "letting her think that I've taken &HeJ.ce," she maid to her husband. "All tl»© samo-"
Mrs. Palton's cook, Emma AitdM. was a •woman of character, tluee yam in her last pace-. a*» tariy riser, fond of childron. and laid other qualities which deserve and should receive cur admiration and respect.
Mrs. Palton gave one of her dinner parties— lionnial. allowing time for :oc**crv before tho next. Emma Blades did her very host. She did not sp-ire herself. Everything was beautiful
Mm. Pallon may hive licrn tired ne%t momnv —could you wonder? It may have simply never occurred t« Ler. Ccftaimy clio omitted any word of compliment to Eniir.a* Blade* next morning, rnd Emma noticed it.
Mrs. Pa I ton showed more tliought fulness later the day, when she reflected that there would ily be the .cutlets to warm up, to be followed ty the remainder in&ce.doine. aid told Emma
"Thank yoU vcrf muehuin," said Biadw. I d. prefer not to." It wa* aaid with a icfrigeratcd rcapectfulww.
" Ho, y«6," said Emma Blades to the house-'pnrlouror after, "1 wasn't going to show I'd troubled my 'cad aboiu it. But however, when it comes to favours—"
Emma Blades warn not only aunt, but also god-mother to her married sister's youngest, Doris, cged ton, who needs to control her tcmpcr-rlnr mother had admitted it. And Emma Blades practically never forgot that Doris had a birthday on May 3rd, and signified the same in the usual manner.
But, of course, a biennial dinner party may put everything out of anybody's head. Besides, Emma had a bad mem try for date* It was June 7th before she discovered that elio had for-gotten our Doris's birthday. She hastened at ode* to an act of reparation.
She sent Dorim macaroons—and it is cone of your business where Emma Blades got them from. They were packed in the card box which had con laincd the bouao-parloum.'s collars, and enclosed with them was an old birthday card which Emma had bread-crumbed from a love of cleanlicoa, and very nearly fried from the force of natural sequence.
And Doris wmlo on a po*t" For she shan't think I care," takl Doris. Notwithstanding. not one of those bLcuits would she eat. She gave them to a - strange dog in tho
Now, that dog was the property ot Lady Yer-meise It had been sent cut for exercise with the second footman. But. the second footman was heavy with Benedictine; for. a* he had obwirvrd to the finst footman, if he did not take it, somebody else wculd. so ho had slept in Boitersea
It warn a small black dog, reputed to be of Japanese extraction. It was all gull and bark. Lady Vcrmoke called the bk'k&dog "Snowball." In fact, all her ladyship'? friends admitted that she wua full of humour; and. after all, it is what our friends say about us which really mat-
At tea time the second footman, by command, brought in Snowball. Xo do/ is really the better for four large macamons. and in any case then* Ms »omethinc Japanese and bizarre about Snow-ball's disposition. lie lay under a chair and snarled.
Knew what that means?"' Lady Varmoiae asked her gue*l* brightly, "Snowball and I am not quite—just a teeny wccnyr-wall. he had to have a little les*on from me. Dogs that snatch nt things which aru offered them have them taken away again don't they. Snowball? 1% hap. pened at breakfast tiw. You should witnra? an i testing rapprochement Here. Snowball, im the sbortbrea,! to wh^h jou are addicted. Gently. Lew. Dr la douceur, Boule^Ieue^e, calme-to* te# transports!"
Upon which Snowball, with rapidity and de-c^ion, b:t Ludy Veriv.owo in the fleshy part of
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