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SOUTHAMPTON TIMES
jronr PAP®.
JUNE 1, 1879
rHE GREAT WANT OF THE PERIOD
* Ii to know where to LVYOUf WONKY TO TIIK REST ADVANTAGE.
T\ FRKNC11-STRKET jwllud l CHURCH-LANK,
Oeld mod SO,l*wJteL _
Timepiece* and Clock* WwlJli.g. Keeper, and Fancy
Bllrcr. Tabic, Deaacrt, and Tea
cwm™,-.
TUk?Uom A,'I*Pel • PEKAMnULATORS, Single ^^and Double
Ballon.' Hani! Requisites

Sfn'TUAjprSN":
sale the following article* :— tee Tea and Coffee Pot*
I Knlrea and Forka
WwWa,^.
Wm *wt FlrJra.. Carpet* anil Hearth Rng* " Carjjentcr*' and Painters
Musical Instrument* Olader*' Diamonds Double and Single Oun*

fK.taNI.hcd 1841.)
rpUE SOUTH OF ENGLAND BILL POSTER.
W. OOLSOM. BILL PORTER end DELIVERER.
ADVERTISING AtlKNT. Ac. . PHILHARMONIC HALL AND #. CLIFTON-TERRACE
BOUTHANPTAN.
Beg* to thank lil. numerous |ns and the public generally of Southampton and nclghlwurhood for the support accorded him for the | **l *i* year*, ami aa»nrca them that nothing on hi* part shall he wanting to merit a coutlnnanco of the favour* hitherto entrusted to him.
HANDIIILLS and CIRCULARS promptly delivered. . Confidential men employed.
A HORHE ami TkAPW COUNTRY WORK.
All the MOST PROMINENT NTATION* la tbe Boutb
K
INAHAN'S LL WHISKY.
THE CREAM OF OLD IRISH WHISKIES.
UNIVERSALLY UECOMMKNDKD BY THE MEDICAL PROFEMION. Dr. His.all mjs "The Whisky I* aoft, mellow, ai
lured, and of very e
Agent—PHILIP \
B
arss
KXSON'S WATCHES. Wmtch mnd Clock
Uie Queen and Royal Family, and by special . . " ' of Wale* and Emperor of Ri
Q0MPUU30RY
8'
HEARTH RUGS,
COCOA MATTINGS. MATS.
FLOOR CLOTHS,
IRON BEDSTEADS.
FEATHER a*n FLOCK BEDS,
MATTRESSES, PALLIASSES,
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE,
$RAA
ME CHIMNEY LOOKING
OAR, WALNUT, AND MAHOGANY FRAME
CHIMNEY LOOEING GLASSES,
MAHOGANY AND BIRCH FRAME BEDROOM
i> Factory). I.ud«at<
-Kri

KNSO.VS AUTISTIC ENGLISH CLOCKS,
e«l witfi Wedgwood and other wi

ENSON'S PA3irHLETS on TURRET
CLOCKS. Watebes. Cbeka. Plat*, amd JewslWy. Olue-sent post free each f-r two slamp*. Watchea safe by Hanson's new woVk, " Time and Time Teller*.
EPPER'S QUJNINE mnd IRON TONIC
pnrifio* And enriches the blood._
EPPER% QULNINk mnd "IRON TONIC
icn* the nArrfs and muscular system._
"PEPPER? QUININE mnd IRON TONIO
»JLi promotes appetite and Improve* digestion.
PEPPER'S QUININE'mnd IROfT TON10
JL animates the spirit* a nd_ mental faculties._/
P^*ETPER% QUlKlNE mnd IRON TONIC
thorouphly recruit* and re-establlihea the general lodlly
er. 137, Tottenham Court-road.
C
DELLARS CORN mnd BUNION PLASTERS.
Boxe*. la. l|d. and 2*. M each. The Com Plaster* are a ccrtalb cure for hard or soft com*, which they entirely eradicate: the Bunion Master* a proved remedy for bunion* and enlarged tee jjlnt*. Sold by all ChetnUU._
R A C ROFT'S ARECA NUTfOOTH PASTE.
ting thla delicious Aromatic Dentrificc, the enamel 01 tl.e Wcth Ivomm white sound, and polished like lrory. It la exceedingly fragrant, and specially useful for removing Incrustation* of tartar on nc*lecte»l teeth. Bold by all Chemists. Pot*. Ik. and Its. Oil, each, ■((let Cr* croft's.)_
T\EAFNESS, NOISES iiTtho EARS, Ac.—
rally cure*, and is strongly recommended by thousand* who hare derived benefit. It is quite harmloas. Bold In bottle* 1* Ijd and A #d ea«h. by all ehemii
LOCKYER% SULPHUR HAIR RESTORER
will completely restore In a few day* grey lialr to its original colour without Injury. It effect* its object satisfactorily.
rlndn* a perfectly natural colour; thoroughly cleanac* th* I from scurf, sail cauae* the growth of new hair. Bold everywhere by chocnists and halnlrewers In large bottle* at la «d eact. B# sure to obtain Lockyer'a Sulpliur Hair Restorer._
Colds, Asthma, lironchlti*,
lungs and air p.«aagca. u soou action, and quite different from ( Bottlr*,!. l&d^ndtiMrich. Silill
TJPJE, WIND, AND

INDIGESTION.
DR. KINU3
DANDELION AND QUININE —"
FOR LIVER, and
FOR LOW
The CoUa*?, (\rrick bn
after an interval of ■
tion, wind, and low me to the ;i year*" intense suffiti

n I general i
crfect health 1
ent, restored
To Mcwi. W. snd H. (Souldlng. Ap^thecarie*. Lc., 1"8. Patrick-strrft, fJork.
ONLY TWO MEDICINES REALLY ACT
CP*IN THE LIVER.
One Mercury or Bluo Pill, the other Dandelion. Tbonwnda of constitutions hnvo been deatroypd by Mercury, Blue Pill, or Calomel, The only m,fc remedy I. s
DM. KING'S DANDELION mnd QUININE
LIVER PILLS, which act gently on the liver, and remove
(Establish -d 1701.)
CORNS and BUNIONS instantly relieved mnd
surely curcd by J-'BR'S IVY LKAF PLASTER. Of all Chemist® nt 1. Ijd. per bni. nr by post for II *tam;« from Jaa Rork». •>»*, nrcit Portlsn.i »lreet, London.
D
KSZIL THOMSONS

# which natnr
rely fr## froi
qqircm. amd wUl prova."upo# IMaL to be Uw n and comfortable aperient obWnabl*.
They promote a healthy aecreUon of bile, cleanse and Invigorate the stonuch. relieve the bead, improve the appetite, purify the blood of cfleto matter, which render* the *kln dusky and aallow, and remove apaams, tickneM, stomacliach*. giddineaa, headache, and all tboao r«lnful and depressing sensations, dependent upon Indigestion, and a slaggial: state of the llvqr and bevela.
flpld by Dav Chemi.U Is. ljd.

mt, Haverntock Hill
ffiiX


Medical Information for the People.—Bo Your
Own Physician.—Now ready, crown 8vo., post free. In envelope, six sUnii*, ' An Alphabetical List of Dlaeasea, with their Remedies. Designed as ■ handy book of reference for hcaiU of familio. and for country invalids. By Hnrar Surru, Doctor of Mcdldne and Hcrgery of the Royal University of Jena. Gives the symptoms and treatment of general disease* ; those of men. women, and chil lren— also' plain directions for treat-tpent pf accident. Gives the name* of the moat approved new Medicine* and the treatment recommended by the author for the euro of each diseaso- -household surgery ; or what to do In case of emergency, rules for diet; or what to cat and what to drink —hygiene—means of preventing disease, and promoting health and longevity,—short, rnmple, and practical Instruction* for reatment of ail diseases. The advice given I* baaed upon the esult of twenty eight year*' successful practice. In thi* work
will be found cverythli
thln^the country Invalid wlshe* of disease. It la a concise c
mtecnth thousand. flfty-*even
_ , . - o wxsL poat free for seven sfsmns,
T>hysical Education ; or the People'* Guide to J- Health. _ On the culture of the healthful and beautiful Ii
■tructioui
unity. Hobjects:—Physical education—law*%f life-how to :nde/ weak muscle* stroug-gvmnaatica-preventlon of disease e of dltcase—*lr, light, akin, diet, bath, 4c., Ac. Give* In-for developing and *trengthenlng the human body— iww w. regain lost health, resulting from loss of nerve power, the effect of overtaxed energie*—over work—city life—worry— brsin toil—internperanoe- how to a*ure long life, and avoid oM ***, Ac—Sent direct from the author. ' -"—H (Doctor of Madldmoof tho Royal Ui' ia). 8. Burton Oesoent. London, WX3.

AND* RHEUMATISM.—
ARMfmtONOH VEGETABLE OOUf AMD RHEU-for Rheumatism; Gout,
MATIG PILLS, a safe and certali---------
Rheumatic Goat, Lumbago, and all Rheumatic Affectlona, u . the varioua names of Face-ache, Tiodolereu*. Ac. Price la.
and Is. Bd. per box. -
cured In a few day*. They are strongly recommended for rratolt/.ua dlrtributfou among the poor, many of whop u, often i«revent«i from obtaining a livelihood for tbsmselvis and fa/nllles by tbl* t"*loful ilisease.
gg^SBfP
the Slood and removiag Hkln Affectlooa. VtWon fSslpTof ^
LOOKING GLASSES,
FURNISHING IBONMONGERY,
CHINA, GLASS AND EARTHENWARE,
AMERICAN mxn OTHER CLOCKS,
CUTLERY AND ELECTRO-PLATED GOODS,
SINGLE AND DOUBLE
PERAMBULATORS,
BROOMS AND BRUSHES,
COUNTERPANES,
LINEN AND OTHER SHEETINGS,
MUSLIN AND LACE
DAMASK AND REP CURTAINS,
E.
Owiag to their Increased Trade, find It
ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY
REBUILD THEIR FRONT PREMISES.
Previous to doing so, however, th< Will clear the whole of their
IMMENSE AND VALUABLE STOCK. Utterly regardless of the coat price*.
rpHE SALE WyLL COMMENCE
MONDAY, MaT 20rM.
CONTINUED FOR TWENTY EIGHT DAYS, After which time the Premise* will be
CLOSED FOR A FEW WEEKS.
HOTEL KEEPERS AND PARTIES
Will do well t) avail themselves of this opportunity
E. H. and Co., knowing fron^ past erpsrisnoe the loss and damage that must necessarily arise to a Stock of* much magnitude, will offer It
AT SUCH PRICES AS MUST ENSURE AN IMMEDIATE SALE. '
The Sale cannot be prolonged under any circumstance* beyond ha data specified.
THE FRONT PLATE GLASS FOR BALE.
Apply to Mr. Jmrd. Surveyor, Oxford-street.
E. H. and Co. deliver goods Free within a dlstaao* of Thirty Mile* with their own horse* and raaa.
E HART AND 00."8
DOMESTIC BAZAAR,
7, 8, A 9, BRIDGE-STREET, SOUTHAMPTON.
• •MkMonrf^ailWafeak.
Q.AMLEN BROS., 85, BXRNARD-STBJEET.
" THE OLD OORMER KM OP.
NO OONNECTION WITH ANT OTHER HOUSE. CORNER of BRUNSWICK-SQUARE ONLY.

riAMLEN BROS.,
V X Comer of Broaswick-
Own make of Trouiers and Vest—».»00 to satect from— i^lld^T* lid. la ltd, lk lid.
ri AMLEN VJ The Old C<
Pootch Twaad Bulla, from 18s «d • Homespun Salts, Ms: Serge Anita, from tla. Send
GA&fLEN BROS.,
Corner of ^Brunswick-
New Spring Cost, *1*.
/^AMLEN BROS ,
\JT EsUblUbed 2S year*.
TT«e little Boys' Clothiers, Hatters, and Outfitter*.
THI HABTLKT OOUHOTL.
Mr. T. Falray.
Mr. T. W. Saou rvportod tk* reodpt of tha follow-
takan la the last Chlneme "War, by Mr. G. Derrick, of BriAhtoo-Urraoa. — Upon the proposition of Major-Generai Tbtom, seconded by Mr. Phipfaku, It waa r*. solv^tosgoapt the rarioua art idea, with the thanks of
TH« BCHOLAUHirfl QDK8TIOK.


scripUoo, bs paid to the
________________tad not be expended la
pay 1#* faea Joe kla Instruction, sad the committee reaolved that In order to ascertain dearly what was ths pn-ciss InUrpreU-Departmcnt pat upon ihe regulations ft
ilttee resolved
piAMLEN BROS..
\JT Old Corn jr Shop only.

/^AMLEN BROS.,
VJT IS, Bernard-street
Youths' Salts—every variety —price* rangtng anoordtng |o sists from «s lid to Ms.
Ac.—of the ke*t makers.
GAMLEN BROS.,
Established n year*. 011 Corner Shop only.
_--J Wool. Cotton.
lowe*t*pri%*! H°"l*rT *
iS, Bernard-street.
Linen Fronts and Wrist*, at
Youths', and Boys'
f]AMLEN BROS.,
VJT The Noted Hampahl
G
BROTHER 0,
OLD CORNER SHOP,
Are this week offering a
LADIES', MEN'S, BOYS', and GIRLS* BOOTS and
A manufacturer'* stock bought for cash, at • FABULOUS PRICES.
bilious and________________________ ___
stomach, sick headache, giddlnesa, fulness and swell In* after meals, dlsxlneesunicsUon be addrsassd. KaUng that Mr. I for asxt year to subscribe A* a* a local
________________ _ mast the Go vera meat grant
of A10. proridsd the Dapa*tenant won 1.1 allow the sum of All
schools In Svathaaptoa, through he was not willing to an berths the A* If the All was to be paid to the scholar a parent or guardian for other tmitimia than for ednoatk*. and not to be expanded In rrortdlng the boy with a eupsrior educaUoo. The Department war* asked whether they oonld appreve of inch a propoaed scholarship, and the oommtttae further resolved that in case the Science and Art grant was not obtained, ths Hartley Council be rroommcndod to increase their scholarship contribution to All fcr this year. [Mr. Hhor* stated In passing that the Department ted replied that they would not approve of the scholarship ] Tbm executive offlc*r having called the attention of the committee to the meaaa of providing scholarships, as brought before the public at the opening of Taunton s hchool, snd suggested the de.tr,Willy of a conference on the subject between the various educational boards In the town and neighbourhood, and manage-a of elementary schools, and fiber persona Interested In the progress of education. It was Oou-ridcred that the Present wss an opportune Urns for such a conference. It was farther considered that It was a subject worthy of aarioaa considersUoo whether t portion, at least, of the cha-ritahla funds In Southampton for the apprenticeship of buys might not mora naefallr now ha directed to provide technics! scholarships, and alai Whether, in the changed circumstances of ths times, such an alteration would not be In accordance with
airaUe that In such a scteme of scholarships and exhibitions opportunities should be provided by which meritorious bora
from the Institnta to the UnlrersiUes, sad It was considered probable that If practical effoet eonld be given to snch a scheme
tber, the public edncational boards In the town would have a rood loan standi in memorallalug the Provost and Fellows of Queen * College, Oxford, to complete such a chain of exhibitions, and to grant one or mors scholarship* to Southampton, thatbeing a town with which the College was so Immediately and Intimately connected. The conference, a* suggested, was held on Friday, tba tith Instant, when the question of making an application to Queens College waa discussed, snd it wastbenght probable that as the Collage derived a large revenue from Southampton, and the Provoat and Fellows wsrs an Adncatioual Cor-porstkm, they might be di-posed to contribute towards a scheme for establishing scholarship* at the Hartley Institution, where
ssfeL-.'&s
Mines. Mr. La Feuvre mentioned to the meeting that there were funds administered by the Charity Trustees which might be usefully employed than at present. Tbeee
for these doles, and recently In SL%at----
returned for that reaaon. Such money might be--------
employed for the benefit of jnor scholar* of the town, and Ii

sneA a caea the ttarity Trustees would still hav* a considerable ante, and a sufflicieut sum from other charities for assisting deaerring «»aca. The fallowing resolutions were coma to:— First, on tba motion of Mr. Darwin, seconded by Dr. Langstsff. "That this preliminary meeting, oo oonsideratloo of the great desirability of providing scholarships which will connect Ihe elementary schools and Taunton's Trads School with the Hartley Inatltution, Is of opinion that It is vary deairable to eatabllah such scholarships, and recommends that the Charity Trustees be reepectfullr requested to consider whether there srs any funds at their disposal which might be employed for this purpose." Bacon d, on Ihe motion of General Try on. seconded by Mr. Chlpperfleld. "That an application be made to the College, Oxford, respectfully soliciting heir support itributiona In aid of a schema of local

For female* of all age* these PUIa are Invaluable, as a few doses of them carry off all gross humours, open all obstructions, and bring about all that is reqnl " " .....
without them. Then is no medl nEECHAMS PILLS for removing iarity of the system. If taken according to tba directions gk with each hex. they will soon re*tore female* of all sgsa to i and robust health.
For a weak stomach. Impaired digestion, snd all diaordi is liver, they act like " MAGIC, and a few doaea will be und to work wonders upon the moat important argaus In tba im\n machine. Thry strengthen the whole muscular system
|«tant me.lldnejn tbywrid.Aoic COUGH PILLH.
remedy for Conghs In general, aathina. dlfflcultv breathing, shortness of breath, tightness and oppression of .... cbesL wheeling. Ac, these Pill* stand unrivalled. They speedily remove that sense of oppression and dlOculty of breathing which nightly dywlvs the patient of rmt Let any person give Baseman's Cocon Pn.t* a trial, and the moat •iolent cough will in a short time bs removed.
Catmos,—The pnlrflc sre requested to notice that the wordi 1" Pills, 8t. Helens, are on Uis Government Stamp * "ie Pijla. If not on, thsr are a forgery, d wholesale and retail by tba proprteto T. Brecham, Cbemlst, SL Helens. Lsncashlrs, In boxes i la l*d and ts. Pd each. Sent poet free from the proprietor for M stamps. -Sold by all Druggists and Patent Medicine
o tbe largest sals of a

N.B.—Fnll directions a


■sffbriog It Is Important they should
NDIGESTI ON
dimcult Digestion of Food. Oppression and UnesWnt the Stomach and Sides, Sallow
lance. Sickness. He*
Tbe symptom* of
IYER COMPLAINT:—
ifiMBSK
AGLETS STOMACH PILLS.—

beam* la tbs countsnano*.
The following Testimonial* will show ths sttcncy sf
"DAGLEY-S STOMACH PILL B.—
wmsm
^Bold In Bosnia, la. lid. and ta. M.
FH3Z
either In the way of contributions In aid of a scheme of I men scholarships, or by ths grant of a college scholarship to th< pubbc schools of 8outhsmpton. Mr. Le Feuvrs having nrged tbl necessity of a public subscription, Mr. Darwin offered a donation of £10, or a subscript Ion of £7 10s. for four years ; Mr. Alderman McOalmont and the Mayor each made a similar offer. It waa alao stated thst Mr Phlppsrd would give the Ai be had peCvloualy promised for the Science and Art scholarships, and that ths Hartley Council bad for several years granted C\ cksrgeaWe on irembers* subscriptions. In aid of a slmlllar
Dr. LanoBTarr, in moving the adoption of the report, •aid that at present there existed in Southamptoo, according to the arrangement of the Endowed .Schools Commission, the recommendation for the elementary schools to be allowed the special privilege of having exhibitions to Toon ton'* School and the Grammar School; and the Grammar School having special funds, was directed by the scheme to lay ont these funds for the parpoee of giving effect to this recommendation. It was stated in the scheme for the management of the Free Grammar School that ths Governor* should not applv less than £35 a year for providing exhibitions entitling the holders to the full amount of the day fees, with or without emolument*. Thus provision was made for these schools ; but there was nothing in the Hartley Institution to encourage a youth from these schools through these exhibitions to bring him specially forward to carry his education itltl further, and fit himself for the Universities or some appointment through tho education afforded in that Institution. The object of the conference was to determine if It wa* possible to provide, for this particular purpoie, that exhibition* should be given from the Grammar School and Taunton's School to the Hartley Institution. [Nuw, in the scheme both for the Grammar and Taunton's Schools, it specially said that the Governors might also, if the state of tho funds sdmitted. establish exhibitions tmnable at any place of higher education an;,roved by the Governors, which should be awarded by open competition amongst boys at school at such times and under such conditions a* the Governors might prescribe. And to show that in regard to the Grammar and Taunton's Schools the higher education to be provided waa to be provided at the Hartley, there was another special provuion in the scheme—" That the Governors shall endeavour to mske the teaching and other benefits provided by the Hartley Institution available for the purposes of the school, and for this purpose shall confer and co-operate with the Hartley Institution." Now Taunton's School had boen lately re-established, and the Grammar School had been put upon a different footing, and under different management: but at present there bad been no conference atoll between the representative* of the various schools and the Hartley Gondii, end it seemed to him most advisable that such o conference should take place, and. If possible, they should devote o certain portion of the funds belonging to each institution to provide for a certain number of exhibitions from the Grammar and Taunton's Schools to the Hartley Institution. Ths Hartley Council had given £5 a year conditional upon its being supplemented by a grant from the Government for several yean past; but that hod now fallen off entirely, through the withdrawal of the Government grant of £10. Then it seemed thai these sohools, although they would
mooer at its dispose!; but it warn possible that it might provide a null amount, say £5, towards o scholarship,
onotibter £& This would make a division of the money Ixirdnn upon the several institutions, end looking upon
Egsg&fflsfBfie
ship fund, and that this fund should go as far as it
ssft l.h S&te
Hi® —
ptSywwMltti '..
•sesrs
raflr. if the link between these schools end the Hartley
--------- open, ond tderefore be did net think
College woe connected with Southampton, and the large amount of property they owned in this town, it was quite possible that they might grant them a pertain proportion of funds to eid in forming some scholarships.
Mr. Daawnr, ia ssoonding the proposition, said he considered it was satisfactory to find that the Hartley Council hod taken up this important Question. He thought that in ony way the Council could show more clearly that they Intended in every respect to take the lead tn increasing the atandard of education jn the town, it was a matter which oould be regarded as much of national as of local importance. No doubt it caused a stigma to rest upon educational efforts when, whilesteps were taken whereby the universi ties gave tbe means to middle-class boys to rise to thi was no syitem to enoli to rise through the intermediate schools; and by some such link as that proposed between Taunton's School and the Hartley, clever boys would be able to take their position amongst tboee in more fortunate circumstances, and not being debarred therefrom through the poverty of their parents, it would tend to the ndvaatoge of the town end the country generally through leading education in a right course. He thought Dr. Langstaff's proposal was o very practical one, and (that each institution should take its shore in the work,sthis being calculated to have a beneficial effect upon the whole. Taunton's School, lately re-e*tabli*hed, he thought wdnld be unlikely, with the funds at its disposal, to allow at the present time more than £6 a year, but as it increased in time, aoy to 200' boys, perhaps they would be able to give £10 o year. He thought Taunton's School hod o greater claim tp Jhs funds of the Charity Trustees than the Grammar School, because it was established for the class just abovs the working class, and also because, chiefly and largely, scholarships in the future would lead to that school. He agreed with Dr. Longetoff that they should have a permanent scholarship fund, though he was perfectly willing to assist in one way or the other. He should be glad to subscribe to any funds f( that purpose (hear, hear), and he thought a oonfsrent between the governing bodies of these institutions would be very advisable, as soon os they sow what funds they oould get (bear, bear).
, Major-General T*ro>» had much pleasure in supporting the motion, though be would not then enter into any details, because the whole question must at present remain in abeyance, and the committee would hi
Brt again to the Council upon o future ■e proposition for the ad then unanimously agreed to.
The Finance Committee brought up a brief report in which they dealt with on application from the Rev. J. L. Camck for a reduction in the cborga for the use ol the Hortley Holl for the purposes of the Oxford Examinations. which, however, the Council did not see their way clear to grant—The report was adopted, upon *k------ _rog_i_m--' *------idsd by

CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY. SOUTHAMPTON AUXILIARY.
[n connection with the annuol meetings of the South-ipton Auxiliary to the Churrh Missionary Society, "moos wire preached and collections made on Sunday in the following churches Holy Rood, Trinity, St. James's. St Matthew's, and St. Lawrence, Soutn-.mpten ; Highfield, SL Denys, Bitteme, Scbollng, and Nursling ; but owing to the very wet morning and the smallness of the congregations, the amounts contributed do not appear to have been equal to those of last year. There were servioMforthe young in the afternoon at Holy Rood, Trinity, and Highfield Churches, and on Monday afternoon there was o meeting for juveniles ot the Victoria Rooms, where also the annual meeting of the auxiliary was held in the evening, which was largely attended. The chair was token by the president (Mr. R. C. Hsnkinson), who was supported on the platform by the Revs. H. C. Squires, a missionary from Bombay, and the Rev. E. Lom be, rector of 8 wan ton Morley, East Dereham, Norfolk, who attended as o deputation from the Parent Society ; the Revs. F. E.
Wikon; Major General 1^)wis (lay secretary). Mr. R. R. Oke (treasurer), and Mr. J. Horsey.—Prayer having been offered by the Rev. F. E. Wioram. that gentleman mentioned tho reoeipt of letters expressive of inability to attend from the Revs. C. D. Kebbel, J. D'Arcy W. Preston. A. J. Swalnson, and G M. Owon.—The Rev. J.JBvllks next read o portion of Scripture, following
Major-Generol Lewis presented the financial report, which showed the receipts to have been General Association. £87 10« 3d ; special benefaction, £24 Is 4d ;
Rood, *8S 6* WtL; All Somte", £92 14s Ud (os compared with £70 7* 9d In 1877); Trinity, £29 Is 5d (ss ootnpjired with £20 2* 31 in 1877) ;
""" MoUhew's, £20 5s M;
snared with £38 7sSd L
SL James's, £11 2s
Bitteme, £54 16e 4d f __________________
1877) % SL Donya, £14 Cs 3d ; fexbury, £4 9* 9d : Faw-ler, £10 10s ; Freemantle, £9 0* 34d; Highfield, £128 19i fid (am com pored with £88 13s 9d in 1877) : Hytbe. £11 1G* 7d ; Nursling, £30 10a (as compared £23 5d loot year); Scholing, £6 Us 7d; SHHsy. £1060s 3il (a* compared with £82 24 lid last year) ; and West End. £8 : these items representing o grand total of £774 10s SI, of which (after deducting £24 Is 4d for expenses) £750 9s 4d had been remitted to the parent
Tbe Rev. F. E. Win ram said though the collections on the previous day. owing probably to the wet morning, appeared liksly to be smaller than usual, he was sure that it was not their intention to send a smaller remittance next year thon this (applause). The following were the amounts of the collections with which he bad as yetbeenfurnisbedScholing, £110s; Holy Rood, 21*. 1%. ** * 1W ; SL Matthew".,
£8 6s 4d ; and Highfield, £10 13s 9J. The rev. gentleman then proceeded to rood the onnuol report, of which the following is an abstract:—
The local efforts of the past year afforded encouragement both regarded present results and future prospects. It appeared
-------'rage annual remittance for the three years
*" I'i. deducting exceptional gifti
end1ngim*™u
and lepaclea fell below that sn'm LTl 170 and"lm f It had "t his rear riienTdeductlnjr legacies, to almost £700 fan Increase over last year of nearly £IM>. Thi* was mainly due to Increased subscriptions from old members of the society, and to the accession of new subscriber*. _ And the commit te* dssirsd to point out thst In those associations In which special eff-rtsbad been i ut
each one of the associations there would bs the same hearty response, and ths annual Income of the suxillary would assume proportions mors worthy of the object and of Southampton. And this was what encouraged ths committee in looking forward to the future. By ths somewhat sudden removal of the lats Captain Hodgskin. R.Nn the committee had lost one of their
er&r&g arsss
Toomer. The committee marked with thankfulness a gradual
Hi
msmm
gfess
rsoslpts of the sodsty compared wiOi those^SF'th7%532g yssr war* as follow*
1
Kakng a total of ZJ0T.MI
1
being sent direct under
itributed specially 'towards

="3=n.
i
5E3S
m
mmm
go«t.rly matins., iri .l«i th. (onn.tio. Sf
Christian, full of ups and down,, sorrows and joya. en conrogemente and discoursgemenes ; but on the whnl. there wos very much to encourage them in the oi^rx. tiona of the society. It was melancholy to hear lMt ▼eor whot the deficiency wos, but that had been more than made u& f worn the deUcwncy. £3Q_mo asked for, and he believed the increase this year w*l £31,000, although the society was still in debt, bavi% spent in faith. Societies were privileged to do what private individuals were not supposed to do-spend more than their income ; but they had made up £9,UOout J the £13,000. The assertion had been made that the evangelical element of the Church of England was effete, but if they looked ot the block coatsst the recent meeting In London of the society, it gave an emphatic contradiction to the statement As Bishop Sydney h»d said, they stuck to the old principles upon which the society was founded. He hsd read m book written by the Rev. Canon Cams, and he there came across the first missionary meeting ever held in connection with the Church of England — that taking pi** Cambria nearly eighty year, mgn, undor the ouwsce, of the Eclectic Society, amongst the supporters of the movement being the Rev. H. Venn, Mr. William Wilberforcc (the grandfather of Canon Wilberforce) the Re*. C. Simeon, end otherm. They could not belong to the London Missionary Society, then one of the only missionary societies in existence, and so thty determined that they mnat hove o society in connection with the Church of England, and start it directly remarking that if they oould not send missionaries'
hibited. It wos the only Instance except one where ony missionary connected with the Church Missionary Association hod met with o violent death, and even in this cose they were not engaged In direct missionary work, but in setting right some misunderstanding which had arisen through some Arab trader. So there was no reason at oil for discouragement, as he believed others had offered themselves, been accepted by the society and were going out to supply the places of those whose death they so much regretted. Colonel Gordon, who was known very well in Southampton, and was the governor of Soudan, wrote homo that they must send men out directly, and that he would guarantee their wfe passage, but he said " Don't send any lukewarm*." So he thought that, under God. there was every pro»-pect of thot.musion progressing. Going to the west-word, they had Bishop Crowthor. who was now Knin» bockwords and forwords on the Niger with his steamer *.nd &3P black archdeacons ; from Broom they heard that King Okiva hod renounced hia idols ; and from Sierra Leone they heard words of great encouragement, for there they were entirely independent of the society, so far as their churches were concerned, and one of the greatest objects of the society was to get native churches and native paators, and to make them self, supporting. Then in Zanzibar the slave trade had l>een almost abolished, while the blow received by the Turks had opened up a wonderful door for the preaching of the Gospel to thot people. We spent millions in notionol defences and notioool improvements, an 1 were they to be content to send o few thousands to carry on such o glorious work os thot of missions ? (applause.)
The Rev. H. C. Sqciiua next addressed the meeting, and remarked, thot there was no more interesting field for mission work than India, and this ahonld le increased by the position we held in regard to the people of India. The control which we exercised over India was nothing less than a despotism. Of course it was not very harsh, nor of the character of the despotism which the Czar of Russia exercised in bis dominions ; but practically we did stand in the position of despots to the natives of India. They had no ;*r-sonal share in the government of their own country, no voice in the framing of their own laws, and no voice in the direction of their internal affairs, but everything was done by England despotically. Therefore they ought to feel in England here their responsibility also in regard to all social and religious reform in thot noble country, bccause, from the very position of that people, they were not likely to originote these reforms amongst themselves. They might ask the question " WJjat is the Government doing towards this work of evan^Uiv-tlonf The Government did nothing directly, but indirectly they were o very useful ally in this work, by preventing ouy violence being used against them, and opening the whole of that land for the preaching of the Gospel The missionaries might go anywhere they liked without being hindered, and bnild churches and schools where they liked, for whatever the feelings of the natives might be, they knew that behind there was the mighty power of Great Britain, which allowed no person to use violence against another. Reference was made to the difficulties connected with missionary work in India on account of the natives being comprised of w mony different races of people ond the casta which existed. They experienced that severely in Bombay, the second largest town in the British empire, for there they bad to deal not with ignorant ond barlwoni people, but with people advanced as far in philosophy and thought os any notion in the world. They felt badly the want of women misaionories in Bombay, for when o mole missionary managed to get access to a house it wos only the male residents their relLnous scruples allowed the missionaries to see. As a maik of the way in which the society was increasing, they had striking instances in the native clergy, who they muat understand were not mere converts, but men who by their mental ond spirituol qualifications, after long test and trlsl. had proved themselves to be fitted fur the . work. The African native clergy numbered 40, headed >y their native bishop, there were threb on the sh res if the Mediterranean (probably formerly Mussnlmins), four in North West America, ten Chinese (amongst whom the work was only commenced in 1S50), twenty-five in Now Zealand, ana the noble band of 105 in India, gothered out from Mussulmans, Hindoos, and Par*ees (applause).
The Rev. E. Lombk followed with on interesting address, In the course, of which he said he felt more than ordinarily at home that evening—although be always felt ot; home ot o Church Missionary meet u; -because, coming himself from Norfolk, it was specially gratifying to find a Norfolk man in the chair, the son of a good old arebdaaoon who had gone to his rest, and who, during his life, lived in tho hearts of tho* among whom he laboured (applause). The rev. gentleman then proceeded to remark that instead of evan gelicalism being effete, as some persons thought, he considered it never showed itself more than at the present time. Sierra Lecne 70 or 80 years ago *as in a wretched condition, but now in those few vears the work waa entrusted to black rectors and black schoolmasters ; but black as their faces were their hearts were as white as any of theirs when washed im the blood of Jtsua Christ. Then New Zealand, which fifty years ago was a den of cannibalism, oould produce its twenty-five native pastors. Then look at the progress made in North-West America and " ' 1, .Iter . 1.W «<
hurches ; and did _ society had made, --,-"7 — —• -ww the Gospel was the pw*** of civilisation, and not civilisation the pioneer of the Gee pel ? (applause). For six years China was barred against any missionary, and to enter Japan was sudden death ; and forty years ago no one ever thought ol entering central Africa. But wonderful work had taken place lu all tboee planes. ,
The CuaiKMOK having tendered his thank« to the deputation on behalf of the meeting, tbe singing of tbe Doxology brought the onnuol meeting to a close, a collection on behalf of the society being made at the
. Erre's Cocoa.—OoaTsm, ui Cosrosnso.-" By a thorough
rPackrts^UbtUsd-"James Kpp* A % Homaopad"4 Hollo vat's Pama.—Indigestion.—Im all cases of Indif?1^' •urtst corrective of the stomach, and the best antidote to 1
ametedwUhMmagreWeeat thessfs,
s a* the purchase M
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