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these national undertakings is that transmitted under the name of the Doomsday Book. This ancient record was not laid down on map or paper, but was a mere catalogue of property. For this survey commissions were sent into the counties with authority to impanel a jury in each hundred, from whose presentments and verdicts the necessary information was obtained. Inquiry was made by this commission into the extent of each estate—its division into arable, pasture, meadow, and wood land the names of the owners, tenants, and sub-tenants—their condition, whether free or servile—the nature and obligation of tenures and
the estimated value.
A partial survey of Ireland took place under the authority of the celebrated Lord Stafford, in the reign of Charles the First. A more extensive one by Sir Wm. Petty, in 1654. This survey was laid down with the chain and with wonderful accuracy considering the period at which it was executed. It consisted of county maps, containing the boundaries of baronies and parishes, copies of which are now in the Royal Library of Paris. Another partial survey was made of Ireland in the reign of William III. Yet these surveys became in time imperfect, and local taxation in consequence apportioned so unequally, that complaints of that inequality were repeatedly made in the Irish Parliament.
In Bavaria, Savoy, and Naples, scientific surveys took place during the last century. The grand territorial survey of France was projected in 1763. Thirty years after that period those profound mathematicians, Lagrange, Laplace, and Delambre, were consulted by the French government as to the best means for carrying it into effect, Jn 1808, it began and was carried on at a cost of £120,000 a year. A survey commenced in England about the year 1793, under the direction of the then Duke of Richmond, who was Master-General of the Ordnance at the time. This survey, however, was not sufficiently extensive to answer all the designs contemplated in its establishment.
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