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and Westmoreland are at present in the course of being surveyed, and offices for that purpose are established at Preston, York, Liverpool, Manchester, and Skipton. The Engraving Department has not yet commenced its labours on account of the survey not having, at the present time, made sufficient progress.
The duties of the department in Southampton will be confined to the triangulation of the country and to map engraving. This department contains two divisions respectively under the direction of Lieutenants Yolland and Cameron, of the Royal Engineers. The division under Lieutenant Yolland was originally located in the Tower of London; but, on the removal of the orphan children from the Military Asylum, the Board of Ordnance ordered the division to be removed to that building. The late lamentable fire in the Tower accelerated its removal. The division under Lieutenant Cameron was formerly employed on the survey in Ireland, and was transferred to the English survey in November, 1841. The whole force at present in Southampton is civilians, 83; military, 31 : of the former there are 9 engravers, 5 draughtsmen, 4 clerks, 60 computers, 1 printer, 2 messengers, 2 labourers: of the latter there are 2 officers, 2 sergeants, 26 privates, 1 bugler. The number of civilians will be increased as the survey progresses, and the military force will receive augmentation in the winter when the severity of the season renders field-work with delicate mathematical instruments impracticable.
The establishment of the Survey Department in Southampton will be of considerable advantage to the town. All the civilians, with the exception of three who live in the Asylum, reside in Southampton. Many of them enjoy lucrative situations, and a great number are talented individuals of studious and religious habits.
The history of Territorial Surveys is curious and interesting. One of the earliest as well as most minute of
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